Author Topic: "Nobody knew that health care could be so complicated.”  (Read 6600 times)

Solon

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"Nobody knew that health care could be so complicated.”
« Reply #15 on: March 11, 2017, 04:08:07 PM »
Never Forget! The Betrayer-in-Chief

On some great and glorious day, the plain folks of the land will reach their heart’s desire at last, and the White House will be occupied by a downright fool and a complete narcissistic moron.
...H. L. Mencken

Solon

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"Nobody knew that health care could be so complicated.”
« Reply #16 on: March 12, 2017, 12:58:50 PM »
An Example of How Trump Scammed Working Class Voters

Quote
A new analysis by Nate Cohn of the Upshot confirms that Trump supporters may have the most to lose from the GOP plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. This chart summarizes its key finding, which is that those groups that stand to lose the most in subsidies to pay for health coverage on the individual market backed Trump:

Those who stand to lose more than $7,500 in subsidies went for Trump by 58-39.
Those who stand to lose between $5,000 and $7,500 went for Trump by 60-35.
Those who stand to lose between $2,500 and $5,000 went for Trump by 49-45.
Those who stand to lose between $1,000 and $2,500 went for Trump by 46-46.

To oversimplify, the analysis combined data from the Kaiser Family Foundation, which estimated how the GOP bill would impact people based on age, income and location of their insurance market, with data from the Cooperative Congressional Election Study, which surveyed tens of thousands of voters about their health care and their 2016 presidential vote. Merging them together, the analysis strives to reach a picture — admittedly “imperfect” — of how the respondents to the latter survey “would gain or lose under the Republican plan, based on age, income and county.”
https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/plum-line/wp/2017/03/10/trump-scammed-many-of-his-working-class-supporters-this-new-analysis-leaves-little-doubt/?utm_term=.0e1696f01fb6

In fact, this analysis underestimates the effect of the Republican plan. By 2020 Medicaid will be gutted and millions of people who have coverage now will lose it. For example, Kentucky has one third of its population on Medicaid--I was shocked to hear that--so Pence visited the Republican governor to try to win his support for the Trumpcare bill. Around 15 million people are currently receiving Medicaid many of whom work in low wage jobs that do not provide health insurance. Many are single parent families dependent on the health of a single worker to provide for the health, education, and success of one or more children---the future of America.

Pence said Obamacare has failed Kentucky, but the uninsured numbers have dropped dramatically. Trumpcare will return the state...and the nation to 2007

https://twitter.com/paulkrugman/status/840684782279364609/photo/1
« Last Edit: March 12, 2017, 01:15:17 PM by Solon »
On some great and glorious day, the plain folks of the land will reach their heart’s desire at last, and the White House will be occupied by a downright fool and a complete narcissistic moron.
...H. L. Mencken

Solon

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"Nobody knew that health care could be so complicated.”
« Reply #17 on: March 13, 2017, 05:01:47 PM »
24 Million To Lose Health Insurance in Next Decade and 14 million by 2018!

The Congressional Budget Office has made its assessment of Trumpcare and the catastrophe  is beyond horrific. It's a Republican Death Wish for low income  Trump voters.

Quote
An estimated 14 million more people would lose insurance coverage in 2018 under the new Republican healthcare plan, according to a budget analysis.
The Congressional Budget Office (CBO), a group of budget analysts and economists, released its assessment on the long-awaited Republican bill.
The group said the number of uninsured would jump to 24 million by 2026.
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-39261503

Quote
Premiums would be 15 to 20 percent higher in the first year compared to the ACA, and 10 percent lower on average after 2026. By and large, older Americans would pay “substantially” more and younger Americans less, the report states.

Proponents of the plan, led by Ryan (R-Wis.), have argued the total number of people covered is the wrong way to measure the law’s impact.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/powerpost/obamacare-revision-would-reduce-insured-numbers-by-24-million/2017/03/13/ea4c860a-0829-11e7-93dc-00f9bdd74ed1_story.html?hpid=hp_hp-top-table-main_cbo-430pm%3Ahomepage%2Fstory&utm_term=.3fbed1762d10

Do you know why premiums go down 10% after 2026? It's because masses of people ages 50-64 will be unable to afford a policy and they will go uninsured. This is the period when heart attacks and other health problems really take off. The death rate for this age group will skyrocket.

Quote
The C.B.O. produces a variety of budget and economic analyses, including deficit projections, legislative options for lawmakers confronting the nation’s most vexing problems, and cost estimates for legislation. Its director, Keith Hall, was appointed in 2015 by congressional Republicans, and it has maintained respect for its objective analysis.
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/13/us/politics/affordable-care-act-health-congressional-budget-office.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=first-column-region®ion=top-news&WT.nav=top-news

Like Trump, Ryan and his Republican cohorts in Congress clearly regard anyone below the median income as useless fodder for abuse and contempt. No one deserves this death sentence, even if they were foolish enough to believe the monstrous liar in the White House and his false promises.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2017, 05:26:52 PM by Solon »
On some great and glorious day, the plain folks of the land will reach their heart’s desire at last, and the White House will be occupied by a downright fool and a complete narcissistic moron.
...H. L. Mencken

Solon

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"Nobody knew that health care could be so complicated.”
« Reply #18 on: March 13, 2017, 07:24:47 PM »
From the ECONOMIC POLICY INSTITUTE
http://www.epi.org

Before the Affordable Care Act, over 15% of U.S. residents were uninsured. Today, that number is less than 10%. That’s 19.2 million newly insured individuals between 2010 and 2015, including 2.8 million children.
 
One of the important aspects of the ACA is that it has addressed economic inequality by making wealthy individuals and the health care industry pay their fair share in taxes. And in return we’ve expanded health care to millions of low- and middle-income families.
 
The new Republican plan to replace the ACA―Trumpcare―would reverse the progress we’ve made.
 
According to the new score by the Congressional Budget Office, 14 million people will lose their health care in the first year of Trumpcare with another 10 million losing health care by 2026. That’s 24 million people who will lose health care under Donald Trump.
 
We cannot allow Donald Trump and Congress to roll back critical health care reforms at the expense of seniors, people with disabilities and low- and middle-income families―all for a tax cut for the super-rich. Sign the petition to Congress today and tell them to reject Trumpcare.
 
Additionally, Trumpcare would cut taxes dedicated to finance Medicare by at least $117 billion and cut Medicaid by $370 billion. It uses cuts to Medicaid and reductions in subsidies that help people purchase insurance through exchanges in order to give a $465 billion tax break to the wealthy, health insurance companies and the pharmaceutical industry―including a $7 million annual tax break to the wealthiest 400 U.S. households.
 
Currently, 10 million seniors and people with disabilities receive joint Medicare and Medicaid coverage. Medicaid covers the cost of long-term care for over 60 percent of nursing home patients.
 
Trumpcare’s deep cuts to Medicaid will do more than kick millions off of their health care. It will also jeopardize the long-term care of millions of seniors, forcing families to make tough decisions about how to care for loved ones.
 
Sign the petition today and tell Congres to reject Trumpcare―a bill that cuts Medicaid and guts Medicare’s financial base, kicks millions of low- and middle-income families off of their health care, and provides a massive tax break to the super-rich.
http://www.epipolicycenter.org/trumpcare-2017/?ref=mc&utm_source=Economic+Policy+Institute&utm_campaign=6c562cf97b-Trumpcare_petition3_13_2017&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_e7c5826c50-6c562cf97b-55904801&mc_cid=6c562cf97b&mc_eid=eaecff65a9
 
Together let’s protect the health care of U.S. families and build an economy that works for everyone, not just the wealthy few.
 
Thank you,
 
Josh Bivens
Director of Research, EPI Policy Center
On some great and glorious day, the plain folks of the land will reach their heart’s desire at last, and the White House will be occupied by a downright fool and a complete narcissistic moron.
...H. L. Mencken

Solon

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"Nobody knew that health care could be so complicated.”
« Reply #19 on: March 13, 2017, 08:13:02 PM »
I have had occasion to visit local institutions that care for the aged over the last several years. My parents were fortunate in being able to live in a relatively nice location for their final years. For the last month's of my mother's life, however, dementia necessitated her move to a facility that cost $6,000 per month. For most of the residents this cost is covered by Medicaid.  I suddenly saw hundreds who survived with a modicum of dignity from the care afforded by Medicaid. It was an eye-opening experience.

If Trumpcare is passed, there are millions of people who will not receive this coverage and will be unable to afford a retirement center, period. If you and your parents are affluent enough, this may not be a problem for you. Maybe you are able to care for you aged parents in your home. Maybe you have brothers and sisters who can help. If you were like me you will bear that responsibility alone. You may not face that situation now, but, sooner or later, most of you will. If your parents are not able to pay for an expensive retirement center, the cuts to Medicaid in Trumpcare will foreclose Medicaid assistance for your parents and you at the end of their lives. This is the point at which they may not be able to walk, dress themselves, or use the bathroom independently. They must have help for every act, even getting into or out of a chair. Sometimes they must be fed. Believe me, it is expensive, painful, and all-consuming, made more so if you are not able to give them the help they need; but, it is a great relief to your conscience if you can. This is a circumstance where Medicaid is used by people who have never thought they would need it.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2017, 11:03:41 PM by Solon »
On some great and glorious day, the plain folks of the land will reach their heart’s desire at last, and the White House will be occupied by a downright fool and a complete narcissistic moron.
...H. L. Mencken

Solon

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"Nobody knew that health care could be so complicated.”
« Reply #20 on: March 13, 2017, 11:09:12 PM »
The most recent administrator of Medicaid stated that half, yes he said HALF, of births in the US are covered by Medicaid and children are one of the prime groups covered by the program. So cuts will not only impact the end of life for millions of the aged, but the beginning of life for millions of children as well.  He was interviewed tonight on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell.
http://www.msnbc.com/the-last-word
On some great and glorious day, the plain folks of the land will reach their heart’s desire at last, and the White House will be occupied by a downright fool and a complete narcissistic moron.
...H. L. Mencken

Solon

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"Nobody knew that health care could be so complicated.”
« Reply #21 on: March 14, 2017, 01:20:05 AM »
White House analysis of Obamacare repeal sees even deeper insurance losses than CBO

Quote
A White House analysis of the GOP plan to repeal and replace Obamacare shows even steeper coverage losses than the projections by the Congressional Budget Office, according to a document viewed by POLITICO on Monday.

The executive branch analysis forecast that 26 million people would lose coverage over the next decade, versus the 24 million CBO estimates. The White House has made efforts to discredit the forecasts from the nonpartisan CBO.

...The analysis found that under the American Health Care Act the coverage losses would include 17 million for Medicaid, six million in the individual market and three million in employer-based plans.

A total of 54 million individuals would be uninsured in 2026 under the GOP plan, according to this White House analysis. That’s nearly double the number projected under current law.
http://www.politico.com/story/2017/03/obamacare-uninsured-white-house-236019

Trump knew his health care plan was a travesty even before the CBO passed judgement on it today. Yet, even though he KNEW it violated everything he promised about health care during the campaign, he promoted it by calling it "our wonderful new Healthcare Bill." He has no excuse.
On some great and glorious day, the plain folks of the land will reach their heart’s desire at last, and the White House will be occupied by a downright fool and a complete narcissistic moron.
...H. L. Mencken

Solon

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"Nobody knew that health care could be so complicated.”
« Reply #22 on: March 14, 2017, 01:23:24 AM »

TRUMPCARE vs. OBAMACARE
CBO projections
On some great and glorious day, the plain folks of the land will reach their heart’s desire at last, and the White House will be occupied by a downright fool and a complete narcissistic moron.
...H. L. Mencken

Solon

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"Nobody knew that health care could be so complicated.”
« Reply #23 on: March 14, 2017, 04:24:11 PM »
There is an interesting article at healthinsurance.org that raises several questions about the shoddy process and vicious consequences of the Trumpcare proposal.

Quote
The American Health Care Act (AHCA) is House Republicans’ bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. The bill is also politically self-immolating. I just don’t understand what Republicans are trying to do here.

...the bad news keeps coming. Table 4 of CBO’s report describes the impact of AHCA on nongroup health insurance premiums. As I read the table, a 64-year-old with a yearly income of $26,500 would see his annual net premium increase from $1,700 to a whopping $14,600—and this for a markedly less generous plan.

Whatever the policy issues, a $12,900 premium increase on low-income 64-year-olds is political suicide. If this actually happened, Republicans would be destroyed at the polls next November. This was utterly predictable, too, given the main features of the Republican bill.

...Which raises a strange question: How and why did Republicans propose such a politically damaging plan in the first place? I have been studying and practicing health policy for more than twenty years. I have never seen a less-professional, more shambolic legislative process than the one Republicans are now pursuing.

...Republicans have managed to propose something opposed by nearly every major interest group: the American Hospital Association, the American Medical Association, AARP, and the health insurance industry. Anti-ACA conservative commentators hate the bill. Republican governors in Ohio, Illinois, Massachusetts, Arizona, and Nevada have also come out against key pillars of AHCA, as have key Republican Senators.

From a policy-wonk perspective, Republicans are doing scarcely better. Merely debating AHCA runs the risk of destabilizing the individual insurance market, whose proposed 2018 premiums will be announced beginning in May. Republicans’ proposed alternative to the individual mandate—the one truly unpopular component of Obamacare—does too little to maintain coverage and to stabilize health insurance premiums. Republican politicians, having just been savaged at unruly town halls, dread what may come next if they are held responsible for millions of people losing coverage and nightly news coverage of cancer patients with bills they can’t pay.

...So as of now, Republicans have created a political and policy fiasco. Perhaps this fiasco is the result of simple incompetence. But AHCA is such a fiasco that I wonder, alongside many others, whether Republicans are even trying to pass it. Whatever the cause, the driving dynamic behind this fiasco is noteworthy.

Most important, Republicans failed to put in the work at the interface of politics and policy required to responsibly turn our $3.4 trillion medical political economy. Democrats crafted ACA over many months and years. The process involved repeated CBO scoring, analysis inside and outside government by many of America’s most respected health policy experts who knew this was hard, and really wanted to get things right. Democrats did the hard political and policy work in 2006, 2007, and 2008 that presaged the ACA, long before anyone expected Barack Obama to be President, Democratic Party interest groups and policy experts had gotten together, hashed out their differences, and coalesced around what would eventually become ACA. Had the 2008 primaries played out somewhat differently, we would now be debating ClintonCare or EdwardsCare, which would have both looked much like ACA. The Senate bill that became ACA included more than 150 Republican amendments, too.

Not that ACA is perfect—far from it. Working and middle-class people need more financial help than ACA provides. (Had ACA done more there, Hillary Clinton would now be President. Well, that’s another story.) ACA’s so-called “family glitch” excluded many people with poor workplace coverage. Out of partisan spite, deep-red states shut out three million poor people from coverage under the new law. Tim Jost and I, and a crack Urban Institute team, have proposed many ways to improve ACA. Most realistic fixes to ACA require more spending, not less. You can’t slash spending on ACA and provide better insurance coverage.

So as of now, Republicans have created a political and policy fiasco. Perhaps this fiasco is the result of simple incompetence. But AHCA is such a fiasco that I wonder, alongside many others, whether Republicans are even trying to pass it. Whatever the cause, the driving dynamic behind this fiasco is noteworthy.

Whatever ACA’s defects, AHCA looks visibly rushed and shoddy by comparison. Republicans just haven’t put in the work. We don’t even know how shoddy AHCA is, since the bill has barely been exposed to careful scrutiny, let alone being road tested on our $3.4 trillion medical economy. In theory, President Trump and his administration could step in to coordinate Republican efforts, to craft and mobilize behind a more substantial bill to address these problems. So far, anyway, the President lacks the expertise, the personal credibility, or consistent focus to play this unifying role. Although he is well-liked among Republican primary voters, he is disliked and distrusted by most Republican political professionals. That’s an obstacle, too.

Republicans have also been dishonest about what Obamacare actually is and what is required to make it better. Since 2010, Republicans such as Rep. Tom Price honed their legislative chops by preparing “repeal and replace” bills that would snatch coverage from twenty million people while damaging state budgets and punishing health care providers.

Since these measures would never be enacted, Republicans in Washington paid no political price. Out of power, they could market to their core constituents who distrusted Democrats. They could attack Medicaid expansion as another wasteful welfare program that provides bad insurance to unworthy people, and complain about death panels. They could lambast ACA’s marketplaces for high premiums and deductibles that any realistic Republican proposal would actually make worse. They could avoid speaking to voters about the one policy change Republicans actually agreed upon: cutting the taxes on wealthy people used to finance Medicare and ACA.

Medicaid expansion is the public health jewel of ACA. In Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky, and elsewhere, Republican governors and the Obama administration have admirably negotiated, spending billions of dollars to expand coverage, keep open rural hospitals, address the opioid epidemic in rural America. In my own research, I’ve talked with addiction professionals around the country who work for Republican governors and legislators. Many are proud of what they have accomplished.

In part because Republican governors helped to craft and run it, Medicaid expansion seems surprisingly durable. Ironically, it has greater bipartisan support than the market-oriented ACA marketplaces do. The marketplaces are more fragile, often offer a worse human experience than Medicaid does, and have no local political owner aside from the President of the United States. Giving Republican governors a stake turns out to be the secret weapon in sustaining expanded health insurance coverage.

At least that’s how things look right now. I confess I have no idea what will happen on health reform.


https://www.healthinsurance.org/repeal-and-replace/will-repeal-and-replace-implode/
« Last Edit: March 14, 2017, 04:27:07 PM by Solon »
On some great and glorious day, the plain folks of the land will reach their heart’s desire at last, and the White House will be occupied by a downright fool and a complete narcissistic moron.
...H. L. Mencken

cubsfanbudman

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"Nobody knew that health care could be so complicated.”
« Reply #24 on: March 14, 2017, 08:16:15 PM »
SM does not respond to facts.
"the difference between stupidity and genius is that genius has it\'s limits"
albert einstein

Solon

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"Nobody knew that health care could be so complicated.”
« Reply #25 on: March 14, 2017, 08:28:35 PM »
Trump loyalists sound alarm over ‘RyanCare,’ endangering health bill

OK, this is the first discussion about Trump's relationship to Trumpcare that makes sense. What I don't understand is how Trump did not see this coming from the very beginning. He endorsed the plan and has reportedly been working the opposition in the Republican party to support it. Evidently Breitbart Bannon can't get through that orange head sometimes either. It dawns on me that he never read the bill or had a clue what it would do to his most avid supporters. He just wanted a legislative win that would fulfill a campaign promise. Clearly he leaves the details to lesser mortals. I doubt he would get the reference to a Pyrrhic victory, but this might be a chance for him to embellish his classical education. LOL

Quote
From headlines at Breitbart to chatter on Fox News Channel and right-wing talk radio, as well as among friends who have Trump’s ear, the message has been blunt: The plan is being advanced by congressional Republican leaders is deeply flawed — and, at worst, a political trap.

Trump’s allies worry that he is jeopardizing his presidency by promoting the bill spearheaded by House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (Wis.), arguing that it would fracture Trump’s coalition of working- and middle-class voters, many of them older and subsisting on federal aid.

...Fox News host Eric Bolling, who once considered joining the Trump administration and is friendly with the president, published an op-ed Tuesday on the network’s website that said Ryan and the “establishment GOP have pulled a fast one on President Trump.”

“It’s time for President Trump to scrap the GOP health-care bill,” Bolling wrote.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/trump-loyalists-sound-alarm-over-ryancare-endangering-health-bill/2017/03/14/cfc187e6-08dc-11e7-93dc-00f9bdd74ed1_story.html?hpid=hp_hp-cards_hp-card-politics%3Ahomepage%2Fcard&utm_term=.63ac200f7655
On some great and glorious day, the plain folks of the land will reach their heart’s desire at last, and the White House will be occupied by a downright fool and a complete narcissistic moron.
...H. L. Mencken

Solon

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"Nobody knew that health care could be so complicated.”
« Reply #26 on: March 17, 2017, 07:35:13 PM »
MARCH 17
It has become clear that Trump is so far out of his depth that it's almost beyond comprehension. Whether it's an inability to read, or dementia has destroyed his ability to comprehend, or he is so delusional that he thinks whatever comes to mind is reality, or he is just a compulsive liar, Vox explains why I say that, especially about Trumpcare.
(Vox has no paywall and no one crunches data better than Ezra Klein.)

Quote
“I want everyone to know I'm 100 percent behind [the American Health Care Act],” President Trump said today. “The press has not been speaking properly about how great this is going to be. I watch, I say, ‘That’s not the bill we’re passing.’

But does Trump really know what’s in the bill he’s passing, or trying to pass?

With the help of Vox’s Jacob Gardenswartz, I collected and read absolutely everything Donald Trump has said publicly about the AHCA. The transcripts cover speeches, rallies, meetings with congressional leaders, interviews with friendly news outlets, and, of course, tweets.

I learned a few things from the exercise. First, Trump has a very limited set of talking points on health care, and he repeats the same words and sentences constantly — his comfort zone on both the issue and the legislation is very narrow.

Second, Trump seems confused about what the GOP bill does. It is possible, of course, that he knows more than he is saying, and has decided to simply say things that aren’t true. But it’s also possible he’s being spun by more ideologically motivated advisers (that’s certainly the narrative pro-Trump outlets like Breitbart are pushing).

Third, Trump has bought into a caricature of Obamacare’s condition that heavily informs his thinking on both the politics and the policy of the AHCA. This could prove more consequential than people realize.

The AHCA does literally none of the things Trump says it does

Does Donald Trump know what the GOP health bill does?
Maybe not.

http://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2017/3/17/14961066/donald-trump-gop-health-bill
« Last Edit: March 17, 2017, 07:44:11 PM by Solon »
On some great and glorious day, the plain folks of the land will reach their heart’s desire at last, and the White House will be occupied by a downright fool and a complete narcissistic moron.
...H. L. Mencken

Solon

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"Nobody knew that health care could be so complicated.”
« Reply #27 on: March 19, 2017, 03:35:17 PM »
Trump and Ryan will get the conservative "Freedom" LOL Caucus to buy into their health reform/tax cut for the rich plan if they force the lazy bums on Medicaid to work, except...well...most of them can't. It's death panels without the panels.

On some great and glorious day, the plain folks of the land will reach their heart’s desire at last, and the White House will be occupied by a downright fool and a complete narcissistic moron.
...H. L. Mencken

jonas_24112

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"Nobody knew that health care could be so complicated.”
« Reply #28 on: March 20, 2017, 09:14:40 AM »
Quote from: Solon;1776
The most recent administrator of Medicaid stated that half, yes he said HALF, of births in the US are covered by Medicaid and children are one of the prime groups covered by the program. So cuts will not only impact the end of life for millions of the aged, but the beginning of life for millions of children as well.  He was interviewed tonight on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell.
http://www.msnbc.com/the-last-word



What this tells me is that 50% of the population cannot afford medical care......ergo medical care is too expensive and the majority of the population is too poor to afford it.  Medicaid expansion, tax credits, healthcare reform are all just code for socialized insurance.  

As a center right conservative, even I can get behind socialized medicine.  My idea.....

1.  Insurance becomes wage based tax, same as income taxes, medicare, etc.  
2.  Turn insurance companies into non-profits that manage "medical tax" to pay out to docs.
3.  Insurance & big brother regulate medical and pharma industry to reduce costs.

Yes, the rich will be able to afford supplements for better or faster care, but at least for the liberals sake....everyone will get basic healthcare.

Solon

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"Nobody knew that health care could be so complicated.”
« Reply #29 on: March 21, 2017, 01:50:46 PM »
The "replace" bill Republicans are currently backing is actually worse than a simple repeal of the Affordable Care Act. A million MORE people will lose health insurance under the provisions of the bill than if they simply repealed it.

Quote
Late Monday, House leadership revealed a set of amendments to the bill, which will be considered when the bill comes up for a vote. But, if they are adopted, the changes are unlikely to have major effects on overall coverage numbers. If anything, the changes might lead to a larger increase in the number of Americans without health insurance.

 
The 7 Big Revisions Republicans Made to Their Health Care Bill, and Why They Made Them
The people who would end up without health insurance are slightly different in the two cases. The current bill would cause more people to lose employer insurance, while a straight repeal bill would most likely cause more people who buy their own coverage to become uninsured. A simple repeal would be worse for Americans with pre-existing conditions, but the current bill would be worse for older Americans who are relatively healthy. Both approaches would lead to major reductions in the number of Americans covered by Medicaid.

The bill that Congress passed in 2016 is the third scenario. It would have kept Obamacare’s major insurance regulations on the books, including its rule that health insurers need to sell insurance at the same price to healthy and sick customers of the same age. It would have removed funding for the expansion of Medicaid, dropped subsidies to help people buy health coverage, and eliminated the individual and employer mandates in the law.

The results of those changes would be drastic: In a decade, 32 million more people would be without health insurance, according to the estimates. The C.B.O. essentially said it was a policy combination that would break the insurance market, resulting in substantially more people losing coverage than gained it under Obamacare.

...All three approaches would result in meaningful reductions in the number of Americans with health coverage. But, in the end, it appears that the long-term effects of the current Republican plan don’t look that different from full repeal.



Fewer Americans Would Be Insured With G.O.P. Plan Than With Simple Repeal
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/21/upshot/fewer-americans-would-be-insured-with-gop-plan-than-with-simple-repeal.html?smid=tw-share
« Last Edit: March 21, 2017, 01:54:01 PM by Solon »
On some great and glorious day, the plain folks of the land will reach their heart’s desire at last, and the White House will be occupied by a downright fool and a complete narcissistic moron.
...H. L. Mencken