Author Topic: My Trip To Russia  (Read 7639 times)

cubsfanbudman

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My Trip To Russia
« Reply #30 on: October 19, 2016, 02:19:09 PM »
looks like yo had an amazing visit.
"the difference between stupidity and genius is that genius has it\'s limits"
albert einstein

Bill Wyatt

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« Reply #31 on: October 19, 2016, 06:37:41 PM »
Enjoying your posts Solon.
It's a happy enchilada... (John Prine)

cubsfanbudman

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« Reply #32 on: October 19, 2016, 10:51:30 PM »
i would love to go to england and see all the history there,then go to normady beach in france because it was the turning point for the allies in ww2.
"the difference between stupidity and genius is that genius has it\'s limits"
albert einstein

Solon

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« Reply #33 on: October 23, 2016, 12:04:07 AM »
I spent 9 days in London a while ago but I would really like a tour of the UK.
On some great and glorious day, the plain folks of the land will reach their heart’s desire at last, and the White House will be occupied by a downright fool and a complete narcissistic moron.
...H. L. Mencken

Solon

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« Reply #34 on: October 23, 2016, 12:41:07 AM »
Iconostasis

The Iconostasis is an interior wall-like structure in an Orthodox church that separates the sacred area of the sanctuary occupied by the priest from the believers and the nave. The traditional iconostasis is covered in icons according to a particular pattern. It is glorious in gold and color. Most churches do not permit photos inside. There were a few exceptions.

This is the traditional iconostasis display scheme.
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This example is from the Church of the Resurrection in the wooden architectural museum near Suzdal I displayed in a previous post.
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This example is from the Church of the Dormition (Assumption) in Yaroslavl
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This example is from the Church on Spilled Blood that was built on the St. Petersburg site of the assassination of Tsar Alexander II in 1881. It is a much modified example following the deviation from traditional patterns found as a result of the influence of Western European sources.
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The exterior of the Church on Spilled Blood is heavily decorated.
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« Last Edit: April 02, 2017, 09:46:20 AM by Solon »
On some great and glorious day, the plain folks of the land will reach their heart’s desire at last, and the White House will be occupied by a downright fool and a complete narcissistic moron.
...H. L. Mencken

Solon

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« Reply #35 on: October 25, 2016, 06:31:23 PM »
Novodevichy Convent

Grand Prince Vasilii III of Muscovy, father of Ivan IV (The Terrible)  founded the Convent in 1524. It was the residence for a number of aristocratic women and the scene of historic events. Peter I (The Great) had members of the rebelling streltsy hung outside the convent window of his sister. She had attempted to rule in his place and encouraged the rebellion. It forced an early return from his famous tour of Europe.  Napoleon attempted to burn it down in retribution for Russian resistance. Today it is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The Convent cemetery is the burial site for important people from the military, political and cultural elements of Russian society. Its famous residents include Gogol, Chekov, Shostakovich, Stanislavski, Prokofiev, Yeltsin, Khrushchev, and Rostropovich.

An exterior view of the Convent
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The Cemetery Gate
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The tomb of Mstislav Rostropovich (March 27, 1927 – April 27, 2007). He was an internationally admired cellist and conductor.
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The tomb of Nikita Khrushchev (April 15, 1894 – September 11, 1971). He succeeded Stalin as Secretary of the Communist Party and leader of the Soviet Union. He is known for denouncing Stalin in 1956 for his crimes against the Russian people. His reckless effort to install nuclear weapons on Cuba led to the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962 and brought us close to a nuclear war. He and President Kennedy worked through the crisis using a "hot line" telephone connection and averted a world catastrophe. These events undermined his standing in the Politburo and led to his replacement at the top of the power structure in Moscow.
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« Last Edit: April 02, 2017, 09:46:39 AM by Solon »
On some great and glorious day, the plain folks of the land will reach their heart’s desire at last, and the White House will be occupied by a downright fool and a complete narcissistic moron.
...H. L. Mencken

Bill Wyatt

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« Reply #36 on: October 25, 2016, 07:24:00 PM »
Very nice.
It's a happy enchilada... (John Prine)

Solon

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« Reply #37 on: October 25, 2016, 08:24:54 PM »
Thanks for your encouragement, Bill.

I didn't want to put this at the beginning of the thread, but it is necessary advice for travelers to Russia:

Any water you drink or use to brush your teeth must come from a sealed bottle that you open. When you take a shower or swim in a pool, keep your mouth shut.

Before every meal, chew one pink tablet of bismuth subsalicylate (sold as Pepto-Bismol).

Follow these two steps and you will avoid some unpleasantness. If you don't, expect to spend time searching a local pharmacy for Immodium. Yes, it is widely available in both Moscow and St. Petersburg. (Hmmm...I wonder why?)

Other good advice from Staying Healthy While Traveling the Globe
http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/02/22/staying-healthy-while-traveling-the-globe/
« Last Edit: October 26, 2016, 12:51:26 PM by Solon »
On some great and glorious day, the plain folks of the land will reach their heart’s desire at last, and the White House will be occupied by a downright fool and a complete narcissistic moron.
...H. L. Mencken

cubsfanbudman

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« Reply #38 on: October 26, 2016, 12:48:46 AM »
my nephew is a preacher in richmond,every other year he goes to turkey with the misssionaries .he always comes back with stomach problems from there
"the difference between stupidity and genius is that genius has it\'s limits"
albert einstein

Solon

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« Reply #39 on: October 26, 2016, 04:31:01 AM »
I have traveled over most of Italy, Greece (including the Aegean and Ionic Islands), most of Germany, the Adriatic Coast including Dubrovnik and a few Croatian islands, London, Paris, and parts of Turkey, including several days in Istanbul. Russia is the only place I have had a problem and that didn't occur until we had stayed in several hotels in the small towns of the Golden Ring. In the case of Turkey, the Aegean and the Adriatic islands, however, I was on a small ship in various harbors, and did not stay in a hotel. I think tap water is the likely culprit in most cases. As I discovered, you have to be very careful when showering and use bottled water when brushing your teeth. In Russia the restaurants always provided bottled water, but that's true everywhere I have traveled. In Rome there are water fountains scattered everywhere around the city and I never hesitated to drink from them, following the example of the locals. I wouldn't attempt that anywhere else.
On some great and glorious day, the plain folks of the land will reach their heart’s desire at last, and the White House will be occupied by a downright fool and a complete narcissistic moron.
...H. L. Mencken

Bill Wyatt

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« Reply #40 on: October 26, 2016, 01:50:54 PM »
So what exactly is it and why is it so bad in Russia? I'd never heard of this. I've always heard about people in the U.S. having stomach troubles when they go to Mexico, but the explanation I always heard was that we have no natural antibodies to foreign organisms. Same in Russia? If so, why is it not an issue in Italy?
It's a happy enchilada... (John Prine)

Solon

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« Reply #41 on: October 26, 2016, 09:21:59 PM »
It's not so bad to have to drink bottled water exclusively or use it to brush your teeth. Not all countries treat tap water with chemicals that make it safe to drink. You have to be careful wherever you travel. My trust in Rome does not extend to the rest of Italy and I am referring to the traditional outside fountains not to tap water in the hotels. If you are with a touring company, the rep can advise you on what is safe or not. We were advised not to drink the tap water in Russia. I haven't been to Mexico so I can't comment on that. I know that 9 of the 12 people in our group had a problem, but not at the same time. That's why I don't believe it was a food issue since, on this trip, we ate together nearly all the time. It's my opinion that water was the problem, but I don't have any medical evaluation to back it up. Everyone self-medicated. Still, not a single person let that problem interfere with the busy schedule we had to maintain and everyone was as enthusiastic about the trip at the end as at the beginning. In my case, I think I was more enthusiastic at the end. I am still reading about Russian topics. Usually after a trip I move on to reading about my next destination. So, this aside should not discourage anyone from travel to Russia or anywhere else. You just need to be prepared. That's why I strongly endorse the newspaper article I cited previously:

Staying Healthy While Traveling the Globe
http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/02/22/staying-healthy-while-traveling-the-globe/?_r=0
On some great and glorious day, the plain folks of the land will reach their heart’s desire at last, and the White House will be occupied by a downright fool and a complete narcissistic moron.
...H. L. Mencken

Solon

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My Trip To Russia
« Reply #42 on: October 28, 2016, 05:17:51 PM »
St. Isaacs Cathedral in St. Petersburg: Russian Orthodoxy Clothed in Western Classicism

Only three domed cathedrals are larger than St. Isaacs: San Pietro in Rome, St. Paul’s in London, and Santa Maria del Fiore in Florence. It is my good fortune to have visited all four so I am attuned to the timeline and style of each. It is quite remarkable to me that aside from required Orthodox elements, St. Isaacs could easily pass for a Roman Catholic Church. In fact, had Michelangelo completed San Pietro during his tenure as master of works, it is likely St. Isaacs would look much like it. While the dome was his most visible achievement, he designed a Greek cross floor plan that he regarded as symmetrical perfection for churches.  He did not live to fulfill his vision, and his successors created a Latin cross structure. If, however, you examine the plan below you will see that St. Issacs has a dome over a Greek cross design in accordance with Michelangelo’s ideal.

In addition, the iconostasis, a beautiful display of rich materials and dynamic color, is fully Westernized. The images have no relationship to traditional Orthodoxy. The image of Christ, Mary, and the Saints resemble those found in Florence, Rome, or Venice: full-bodied, three dimensional, and entirely human. Where is the image of Christ “Not made with hands” or any of the three traditional images of the Virgin: Hodigetria, Eumeline, or Onans? Engaged Corinthian columns are also part of the iconostasis—a Roman inheritance prominently featured on the façades of Catholic and Protestant churches.  To Ouspensky (Theology of the Icon) this represents a grievous abandonment of principles. It is a violation of the Orthodox allegiance to the Tradition of the Church passed down from the Apostles of Christ and confirmed in the Great Councils. It is “a mixture of sublimated eroticism and vulgar triteness.”  For a great admirer of Raphael, Titian and the Western artistic expression, it is the most beautiful iconostasis imaginable.

Each of the four sides of the Greek cross are framed in a classic Roman façade of Corinthian columns. Just to give you an idea of the monumentality and wealth lavished on this Cathedral consider that the 48 red granite columns each weigh 110 tons and the upper columns about 67 tons each. The dome is covered with 220 pounds of gold, and the interior columns faced with lapis lazuli and malachite.



A view of the facade
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A model of the church
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Unfortunately my photo of the iconostasis will not upload so I am posting this wiki commons photo URL so you can view it.
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3AIconostasis_in_St._Isaac's_Cathedral.jpg

The image of Christ in the sanctuary looking through the Holy Doors of the iconostasis
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« Last Edit: October 28, 2016, 06:04:21 PM by Solon »
On some great and glorious day, the plain folks of the land will reach their heart’s desire at last, and the White House will be occupied by a downright fool and a complete narcissistic moron.
...H. L. Mencken

Solon

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« Reply #43 on: October 28, 2016, 06:06:16 PM »
St. Isaacs Cathedral in St. Petersburg: Russian Orthodoxy Clothed in Western Classicism

Only three domed cathedrals are larger than St. Isaacs: San Pietro in Rome, St. Paul’s in London, and Santa Maria del Fiore in Florence. It is my good fortune to have visited all four so I am attuned to the timeline and style of each. It is quite remarkable to me that aside from required Orthodox elements, St. Isaacs could easily pass for a Roman Catholic Church. In fact, had Michelangelo completed San Pietro during his tenure as master of works, it is likely St. Isaacs would look much like it. While the dome was his most visible achievement, he designed a Greek cross floor plan that he regarded as symmetrical perfection for churches.  He did not live to fulfill his vision, and his successors created a Latin cross structure. If, however, you examine the plan below you will see that St. Issacs has a dome over a Greek cross design in accordance with Michelangelo’s ideal.

In addition, the iconostasis, a beautiful display of rich materials and dynamic color, is fully Westernized. The images have no relationship to traditional Orthodoxy. The image of Christ, Mary, and the Saints resemble those found in Florence, Rome, or Venice: full-bodied, three dimensional, and entirely human. Where is the image of Christ “Not made with hands” or any of the three traditional images of the Virgin: Hodigetria, Umeline, or Orans? Engaged Corinthian columns are also part of the iconostasis—a Roman inheritance prominently featured on the façades of Catholic and Protestant churches.  To Ouspensky (Theology of the Icon) this represents a grievous abandonment of principles. It is a violation of the Orthodox allegiance to the Tradition of the Church passed down from the Apostles of Christ and confirmed in the Great Councils. It is “a mixture of sublimated eroticism and vulgar triteness.”  For a great admirer of Raphael, Titian and the Western artistic expression, it is the most beautiful iconostasis imaginable.

Each of the four sides of the Greek cross are framed in a classic Roman façade of Corinthian columns. Just to give you an idea of the monumentality and wealth lavished on this Cathedral consider that the 48 red granite columns each weigh 110 tons and the upper columns about 67 tons each. The dome is covered with 220 pounds of gold, and the interior columns faced with lapis lazuli and malachite.

A view of the facade
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A model of the church
[ATTACH=CONFIG]88[/ATTACH]

Unfortunately my photo of the iconostasis will not upload so I am posting this wiki commons photo URL so you can view it.
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3AIconostasis_in_St._Isaac's_Cathedral.jpg

The stained glass image of the Resurrection of Christ in the sanctuary is seen through the Holy Doors of the iconostasis
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A diagram of St. Issacs' floor plan
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« Last Edit: April 02, 2017, 09:48:10 AM by Solon »
On some great and glorious day, the plain folks of the land will reach their heart’s desire at last, and the White House will be occupied by a downright fool and a complete narcissistic moron.
...H. L. Mencken

Solon

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« Reply #44 on: November 04, 2016, 04:27:57 PM »
Rural Homes

Colorful houses of the countryside near Suzdal and Vladimir display decorative woodworking designs.

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« Last Edit: April 02, 2017, 09:49:26 AM by Solon »
On some great and glorious day, the plain folks of the land will reach their heart’s desire at last, and the White House will be occupied by a downright fool and a complete narcissistic moron.
...H. L. Mencken